Your Questions Answered

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You asked I answered.

I asked you a few weeks ago for your questions regarding editing. Here are some of your questions answered. That was fun - lets do it again sometime.

How do you pick a filter that will go with varying lighting? –beyondapostcard

Great question and in my experience this is hard. For ages I used one filter no matter the lighting and I really didn’t like some of the photos. Now what I do is that of presets in terms of sets or groups. For example you might have a set of Lightroom presets that are from the same family and you use different ones for different lighting conditions. But because they are all from the same family they work together. This would be the same as using say the A filter in VCSO (which has 10 different options) or The Good Vibes filters in Colour Story or the Tezza App filters. So you are not choosing one filter, but a family of filters that all work together but you might use a different filter from that family on each picture according to lighting. These two accounts sell presets and are a good example of different filters required for different lighting. @Tezza @sophiaelrae

 

I’d love to experiment with Photoshop but I don’t have the time.  – juliasbookcase

Photoshop can take a lot of time that is for sure, and you really have to like and want to do it. For example, in the beginning I spent most evenings playing with it and sometimes now I can waste an entire day trying to figure something out, but I do love it. First, I would get clear why you want to use it. Is there something in particular you want to do, or do you just think you should? I think lots of people feel they should and really it’s not always necessary. What I did in the beginning was took it one step at a time. So I decided one small thing I wanted to learn, like cutting something out. I just focused on that one thing watching YouTube tutorials until I figured it out. Then I would move on to something else. I think when we look at Photoshop as a whole it can become so overwhelming. So decide one thing you want to do and just try to do that first. And I’ve also found you have to push through that crying ‘I can’t do this’ stage.

To you, which feature in editing is the most important when you want to tell a story? –alltimecarool

For me this is an interesting question because I think the editing has very little to do with the story telling really. The story telling mostly comes from the concept and the set up of the photo. In my opinion, you must know the story you are trying to tell and how you want to make people feel before you start. If you know that, everything else gets a bit easier. I think editing helps create the atmosphere of the picture. For example, if you want a moody picture making in bright and light in editing just won’t work. It’s about matching the editing to the story you are trying to tell. And also I will say sometimes pictures have other ideas and you think you are producing a whimsical fairy tale image and in editing you realise the photo seems to require something different. This happens to me a lot. So if the picture isn’t working in editing don’t be scared to try something different than planned and see what happens. My recent Photoshop example was an example of that – the picture wasn’t meant to have a magical feel but as I was editing it seemed to require that.

How do you make your edits look the most realistic? _pariselizabeth_

Practise, practise and more practise! If you scroll back through my feed you can definitely see some edits that don’t look very realistic at all, but that’s okay because it’s all part of the learning process! I’m by no means the most skilled in Photoshop, so I tend to keep my edits as simple as possible now so they don’t look really fake. The two tools that have helped me a lot are the feathered brush tool for getting rid of harsh lines and brightness adjustment. You’d be surprised what adjusting the brightness of layers can do!

Also bethsbookshelf asked about posing outside and her a blog post I wrote on this How to Stop Feeling Awkward When Taking Photos Outside.

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